DevOps at trivago

Insights, experiences and learnings from trivago's tech teams.

Read SRE: On-Call Procedure at trivago

SRE: On-Call Procedure at trivago

One of the many responsibilities of a Site Reliability Engineer (SRE), is to ensure uptime, availability and in some cases, consistency of the product. In this context, the product refers to the website, APIs, microservices, and servers. This responsibility of keeping the product up and running becomes particularly interesting if the product is used around the world 24 hours every day like trivago. And just like in the medical profession, someone has to be on call to react on failures and outages outside of the office hours.

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Read Being on-call as a software engineer - a challenging and fast learning experience

Being on-call as a software engineer - a challenging and fast learning experience

At trivago, we run webservices with complex backends in different regions around the globe 24/7. Our system is being iterated and developed on a daily basis. Naturally, mistakes will be made and something will break eventually. Engineers being on-call are the first responders to issues with negative impact on our users and the business.

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Read Proper (Java) application life cycle management in Kubernetes

Proper (Java) application life cycle management in Kubernetes

When operating applications in Kubernetes, proper lifecycle management is crucial to enable Kubernetes to manage applications correctly throughout their different phases: startup, runtime and shutdown. Improper or incomplete lifecycle management can lead to incidents with unforeseen and difficult to debug application behavior, such as random CrashLoopBackOffs, broken/zombie services not being restarted or even entire services not becoming healthy after a scheduled restart.

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Read ElasticWars Episode IV: A new field

ElasticWars Episode IV: A new field

On a normal day, we ingest a lot of data into our ELK clusters (~6TB across all of our data centers). This is mostly operational data (logs) from different components in our infrastructure. This data ranges from purely technical info (logs from our services) to data about which pages our users are loading (intersection between business and technical data).

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Read Why We Chose Go

Why We Chose Go

To the outside, trivago appears to be one single software product providing our popular hotel meta search. Behind the scenes, however, it is home to dozens of projects and tools to support it. Teams are encouraged to choose the programming languages and frameworks that will get the job done best. Only few restrictions are placed on the teams in these decisions, primarily long-term maintainability. As a result, trivago has a largely polyglot code base that fosters creativity and diverse thinking. It allows us to make informed decisions based on actual requirements rather than legacy code or antiquated projects.

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